Characteristics Of Knitted Fabrics | Texhour

Stitch length (or loop length) is the key factor to determine & maintain quality of the knitted fabrics. The stitch length, usually measured in millimeters (mm) or inches, is the length of the yarn in the knitted loop. Generally the longer the stitch length, the more open and lighter the fabric. So by setting the loop length, it is possible to knit fabric as a particular gsm using different yarn count and machine gauges.

Characteristics Of Knitted Fabrics | Texhour
Characteristics Of Knitted Fabrics

 

Characteristics Of Knitted Fabrics

1. Stitch length (or loop length) is the key factor to determine & maintain quality of the knitted fabrics.

2. The stitch length, usually measured in millimeters (mm) or inches, is the length of the yarn in the knitted loop. Generally the longer the stitch length, the more open and lighter the fabric.

3. So by setting the loop length, it is possible to knit fabric as a particular gsm using different yarn count and machine gauges.

4. Stitch density is the next important parameter to be set in knitting and represents the total number of needle loops in a given area. Stitch density is the product of courses per inch (or per cm) and wales per inch (or per cm) and is measured in units of loops per square inch or cm.

5. Construction of knitted fabrics is the number of loops – or stitches – per inch.

6. A wale corresponds to the warp of woven fabrics, while a course corresponds to the weft.

 

          Red loops depict a course

knit characteristics

 

Green loops depict a wale 
knit characteristics

 

7. In General, the fabric which has more wales will shrink less in width, and which has more courses will shrink less in length.

8. The fabric that has both more wales and courses will have better recovery from stretching, while that with fewer wales and courses will be less rigid, stretch more easily, fit the body contour better but have poor recovery.

9. A knit fabric is defined according to the number of courses per inch followed by the number of wales per inch. A 24x28 fabric would contain 24 courses per inch and 28 wales per inch.

10. Each wale is formed by a different knitting needle which knits that wale throughout the length of the fabric.

11. In each course, adjacent loops are formed by the same yarn but by different needles. Therefore most, but not all, horizontally oriented defects are yarn related while most, but not all, vertically oriented defects are needle related.

12. Yarn variations in thickness, twist, blend, color or tension are seen as horizontal lines in the fabric.

13. Needle damage such as a bent latch or a bent or broken hook are seen as vertical lines or streaks in the fabric.