Rib Knits | Texhour

The rib is made by alternating knit and purl stitches to form ridges on both sides of the fabric. The number of knit and purl stripes (wales) are generally equal, although they need not be. When they are equal, the fabric has no tendency to curl, unlike jersey fabric.

Rib Knits  | Texhour
Rib Knits

 

Rib Knits

• Rib is made by alternating knit and purl stitches to form ridges on both sides of the fabric.

• The number of knit and purl stripes (wales) are generally equal, although they need not be.

• When they are equal, the fabric has no tendency to curl, unlike jersey fabric. Such ribbing looks the same on both sides and is useful for garments such as scarves.

 

rib knit

 

• Ribbing is notated by (number of knit stitches) x (number of purl stitches). Thus, 1x1 ribbing has one knit stitch, followed by one purl stitch, followed by one knit stitch, and so on.

• The technical back and technical face of a 1x1 rib fabric are identical. The relaxed fabric shows only the face wales. The back wales are hidden on the back of the fabric, between the face wales, and will not be exposed until the fabric is stretched.

• Ribbing has a strong tendency to contract laterally (ie width-wise), forming small pleats in which the purl stitches recede and the knit stitches come forward. Thus, ribbing is often used for cuffs, sweater hems and, more generally, any edge that should be form-fitting. The elasticity depends on the number of knit/purl transitions - 1x1 ribbing is more elastic than 2x2 ribbing.